Master Loner plays Uno – 28.11.12

Well this week as always I have another three reviews for you to read and , as always any feedback on anything on here is greatly appreciated. First of all I went to see P.T. Anderson’s latest film The Master which was pretty awesome. Then when I felt like ranting I listened to Green Day’s ¡Uno! but I found it harder to dislike than I thought I would. Following that was another album review this time a bit more on the alternative side, here’s my write-up for Tame Impala’s Lonerism. Hope you enjoy all of them.

So to leave you with a video, the thing I’m most excited about right now is Ben Wheatley’s new film Sightseers which is due out on Friday, so have a peek at the trailer if you haven’t seen it already:

Lonerism

After seeing Tame Impala perform on Jools Holland I was intrigued to give their music a listen. Lonerism is their second album and it came out at the beginning of October so I thought I’d give it a listen to start things off. They’re recorded sound is quite different from what I heard on Jools Holland, but definitely different in a good way.

Lonerism is like nothing else before it, apart from perhaps Innerspeaker the groups first record. Lonerism blends psychadelics with indie beats, classic rock guitar solos and a constant ambience. The album kicks off with ‘Be Above It’ setting the scene for an unusual album the song constantly has backing vocals creating the basis of the track then instruments and lead vocals are added on top creating a sound similar to something you’ve heard before but with something unique. This track sounds, to me, a lot like Broken Social Scene.

Everything we learnt from the first track is pretty much dashed with it’s follow-up, ‘Endors Toi’ which is perhaps a better indicator for the sound of the rest of the album. It is very ambient, with high-pitched melodic vocals that get lost within the other instruments and moments where certain instruments just burst out above all the rest. Guitar solos that sound like they wouldn’t be out of place on a Pink Floyd album and drum fills that don’t sound dissimilar from something you might have heard by Led Zeppelin.

It’s this old fashioned sound that really gives the band their identity, mixing classic rock and progressive sounds with an indie sensibility ultimately bringing the genre right up to date and giving us one of the greatest albums of the year.